Wildlife Report

Wildlife News for October 2013

Kinkajous are Regular Visitors to duPlooy’s

… joining us on the deck for cocktail hour.  While you are enjoying your half-price rum drinks, they are chowing down on complementary fruits and entertaining us all as they swing down from the trees to grab their complimentary snacks.

Here’s a little bit of Kinkajou information so that you will appear to be “in the know” when discussing Kinkajous with other guests.

Little Known factoid – Though many of its features and traits sound like those of a primate, the kinkajou is actually related to the raccoon.

Dont' bite my hand
Dont’ bite my hand

Kinkajous live in the tropical forests of Central and South America, where they spend most of their time in the trees. They are able to turn their feet backwards to run easily in either direction along branches or up and down trunks. The kinkajou also has a prehensile (gripping) tail that it uses much like another arm. Kinkajous often hang from this incredible tail, which also aids their balance and serves as a cozy blanket while the animal sleeps high in the canopy.

They are sometimes referred to as Honey Bears because they raid bees’ nests. They use their long, skinny tongues to slurp honey from a hive, and also to remove insects like termites from their nests. Kinkajous also eat fruit and small mammals, which they snare with their nimble front paws and sharp claws. They roam and eat at night, and return each morning to sleep in previously used tree holes.

Kinkajous form  groups and share social interactions such as reciprocal grooming. They are vocal animals—though seldom seen, they are often heard screeching and barking in the forest canopy.

dont' pay us any mind
dont’ pay us any mind

Females give birth to one offspring in spring or summer.
The baby is born with its eyes shut and cannot see for a month. It develops quickly, however, and by the end of the second month, it is already able to hang upside down from its tail.

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